Hand out this card (not candy) for Halloween



What is scarier than a crowd of Zombies roaming your neighborhood on October 31? How about a crowd of kids munching on candy?  Instead of handing out sugary sweets, how gamequacces about pencils, toys, stickers, nuts, or other non-sugar treats?  And while you”re at it, plop this card in their bag.

San Jose City Councilman Proposes Ban on Sugar Drink Sales at City Venues



by Jill Escher

Ash Kalra

Oh, happy day for San Jose!  My junk-food-crazy hometown, overrun with obese kids, dialysis shops, diabetes diagnoses, and the lumbering heavy disabled buying shopping cart-fuls of Mountain Dew, is getting a clue!  Well, at least one of its councilmembers seems to be getting a clue.

Councilmember Ash Kalra has proposed — to the sad but predictable eyebrow-raising of his colleagues — the radical and crazy notion of a ban on selling one form of toxic food at City venues, the sugary drink. See  http://www.mercurynews.com/politics-government/ci_23929752/san-jose-councilman-proposes-banning-sodas

Last time I checked, we the citizens and taxpayers of San Jose collectively own those public venues, and must have the discretion to exert reasonable control over the sale of addictive poisons that are fueling a mass epidemic of perfectly preventable disease and disability that threatens to bankrupt our healthcare system.  Is that asking too much? Kathie Dolgin, the sugar-slaying brains behind New York’s Sugar Free Schools movement, speaking about Kalra’s proposal, thinks not:

“We are making our selves sick and NO ONE WANTS TO PAY THE HEALTH CARE COSTS.  I do not think it unreasonable to be asked not to make ourselves sick on public property.  If you were drunk on public property you would be asked to leave or be arrested. Drinking large amounts of sugar that is proven to cause health issues should not go unchallenged any more than public intoxication.”

Now, let’s say Kalra proposed removing other toxic and addictive substances like cigarettes would anyone protest? Of course not.  So what’s the difference?  The difference is ignorance.  The populace has accepted the poisonous and addictive nature of cigarettes, but remains under the delusion that sugary sodas, completely foreign to innate human metabolism, are “fun,” “just empty calories,” and, most damaging of all, somehow a legitimate form of “food.”

Kalra is right: the City of San Jose has no business profiting from toxic liquids that blast our blood sugar levels, spike our precious insulin, induce addiction, and lay the foundation for dozens of preventable diseases.

A single can of soda can have about ten teaspoons of sugar.

Yesterday my friend told me about an obese San Jose boy who visited her house and asked her for soda.  When she said they had no soda, and offered him water instead, he complained, “But I only drink soda, I don’t drink water.”  You… what?  You only drink soda?  If he drinks 6 sodas a day, which one can reasonably assume under the circumstances, that amounts to 60 tablespoons of refined sugar, per day… sixty … six- zero … oh dear, I am going into diabetic shock thinking about this boy. Our tastes are so corrupted and deranged by hypersweet corn-sludge that water, the very foundation of life and health, seems like bitter garbage.

Oh, people of San Jose, take the gift that Ash Kalra is so gently offering us and our children, a small lesson in the importance of distinguishing healthy food from candy-colored harmful poison posing as food.  Sugar is slowly killing us and threatening the biological normalcy of our children.  It’s a first step.  We should take it.

Jimmy Moore's "Cholesterol Clarity" Sets the Record Straight on Dietary Fats and Heart Disease



by Jill Escher, August 11, 2013

Jimmy Moore, who lost 200 pounds eating a healthy high-fat diet, with his co-author Dr. Eric Westman.

When I wrote my book, Farewell, Club Perma-Chub: A Sugar Addict”s Guide to Easy Weight Loss, in 2011, I knew exactly who I wanted to write the introduction, a popular podcaster and author named Jimmy Moore.  Jimmy”s podcast, Livin” La Vida Low-Carb, which features colorful and extended interviews with all manner of people, credentialed and not, who truth-tell about nutrition and diet, was a big inspiration to me as I found my path toward quitting sugar and losing my excess weight. By quitting sugar, flour, starches, and processed food I dropped from a size 12 to a size 6, and emerged as a much more energetic and healthy version of me.

When I say that Jimmy”s tireless work bringing nutritional truths to the masses has saved more lives than a hundred doctors combined, I am hardly exaggerating.  I am in glowing good health today because of Jimmy and others like him who are unafraid to question some destructive pieces of medical orthodoxy. And I know the same is true for countless others.

So when I learned that Jimmy was writing a book spotlighting the falsity of the cholesterol hypothesis of heart disease, I was thrilled. You see, the primary reason Are you an expert in an area of pharmaceutical law?  Would you like to publish a paper similar to the above piece [ regarding ongoing lawsuits concerning atypical antipsychotics ] on this web trustedrxreviews.com where it will be seen by potential clients, scholars, law students and their professors and other people who need to see it?We can pay you for your piece or we can provide you with generous free publicity [in the form of multiple links to your web trustedrxreviews.com and a blurb about the author or authors] on the page that carries your piece [in perpetuity] in consideration thereof. doctors recommend a low-fat diet high in grains and starches to patients is the conventional wisdom, developed out of whole cloth in the 1970s, positing that dietary fat leads to heart disease.  From this false belief has sprung a population with soaring blood sugar levels, obesity, diabetes, and yes, heart disease.

Cholesterol Clarity: What the HDL Is Wrong With My Numbers?, which will be released August 27, will help change the wrongheaded narrative that has ensnared us in this national nightmare.  Its central messages are essential to turning the health of this country around:

• The root of heart disease is systemic inflammation, not “artery-clogging fats.” Inflammation is caused by high blood sugars, smoking, stress, toxics, and other stressors.  The high-starch, low-fat diet recommended by the USDA, ironically, causes heart disease.

• Our blood cholesterol largely derives from the liver”s production of it, not from dietary cholesterol.

• Cholesterol is essential for healthy brain, hormone and muscle functioning. Statin drugs may reduce cholesterol numbers, but simultaneously attack multiple physiological pathways, undermining long-term health.

• Low cholesterol levels are not associated with reduction of risk of heart attack. (Surprise!)

• Most doctors don”t know how to read or make sense of cholesterol numbers in a lab report.

In vintage Jimmy Moore fashion, the book is tightly interwoven with quotes and observations of numerous experts, who bring in new angles and level of detail.  The book sings in a chorus of delicious multi-part harmony that makes it particularly enjoyable and easy to read.

What inspires Jimmy and sets him on his tireless mission is apparent before you even hit the table of contents. The book is dedicated to the memory of his beloved late brother, Kevin, who succumbed to the consequences of misguided low-fat, low-cholesterol orthodoxy at a young age.  Jimmy has made sure that his brother”s premature and completely preventable death was not in vain. Kevin”s spirit lives on between the lines of every page of this worthy and important book.

Jimmy Moore has one of the biggest, kindest hearts I know.  We, the beneficiaries of Jimmy”s prolific teaching, are blessed that he continues his quest to cut through noisy junk science to find the best way to keep that beautiful heart of his so strong.  Cholesterol Clarity should be required reading for all people undermining their own health by buying into the destructive myth that dietary cholesterol causes heart disease.

By the way, Jimmy would be happy to know of my breakfast this morning: avocado, bacon, Brussels sprouts sauteed in butter, and coffee with heavy cream. A high-fat meal if ever there was one, and I have never in my life been healthier since adopting this way of eating, a way that would make conventional medical practitioners shudder.

 

 

Sugar Addiction Is a Brain Disease, and She Can Prove It



by Tricia Zigrang

[Editor's note: At EndSugarAddiction, we know sugar addiction as a brain disease that is physiological in nature, and not as a "behavioral" problem or defect of character. We recently received this story from a reader with a very remarkable story of recovery that seems to reflect our point. Thanks so much to Tricia for submitting this. -- JE]

On July 12th of 2012, I had a brain aneurysm. I was in the hospital 12 days. 10 of that was in critical care. I ended up in the lucky 20% that lived and did not have permanent neurological damage.

But I did even better then that. I had a positive neurological change. My sugar addiction was gone.

I have been a sugar addict all my life. I couldn’t bake cookies because I would eat the whole batch. I think it was related to the fact that my family is riddled with alcoholics. Alcohol is a sugar. I got a sugar addiction instead of alcoholism. I am a psychologist in private practice and have noticed that the majority of people I see with sugar addictions come from families of alcoholics. I have always thought it was something biochemical. I react to sugar the way an alcoholic reacts to alcohol.

When I got out of the hospital, I walked down the candy aisle and discovered I had a complete lack of interest. I went to a potluck and instead of sampling 2 or 3 deserts like I normally did, I had none.

I had no idea if this was a permanent change or not so decided I wouldn’t eat sugar again. I asked my surgeon about this. He said he had never seen this happen before but that my sub arachnoid bleed was right next to my pituitary which controls hormones so it could be related.

I don’t weigh myself and didn’t change my diet in anyway except I added in more fat. I lathered my bagels with cream cheese and put the peanut butter on really thick. I ate whatever I wanted. Eventually I noticed that I was having to pull my pants up. I went to Nordstroms and discovered I was down two pant sizes. Not conceiving that I could possibly drop any more, I bought two pairs of the expensive stretch jeans I like. It wasn’t too much later that I noticed that these were getting frayed at the bottom and sure enough it was because they were too loose and falling down. This time I wised up and only bought one pair. I have now gone down a total of five pant sizes, while eating everything I want.

While this was all happening, I saw Robert Lustig’s book Fat Chance which makes a compelling case that sugar is behind the obesity pandemic. Before 1980 only 15% of adult Americans were overweight or obese. Now 55% are. Fat and protein consumption has remained the same during this time, while sugar consumption has doubled.

I have now added sugar to the list of substances (tobacco, caffeine, alcohol and drugs) that I ask clients about. I think that sugar is wreaking havoc, causing a huge increase in the metabolic syndrome that is behind type two diabetes, heart disease, etc. Not only are overweight people in trouble, Dr Lustig points out that 40% of thin people are insulin resistant. This is because the food industry is adding all this sugar to our food. In fact the obesity pandemic really took off when they started making all these low fat products. They didn’t taste as good so the food industry added sugar to make them more palatable.

Lustig points out that trying to get the government to do anything about this has been fruitless (the sugar lobby is probably pretty powerful) and that what is going to have to happen is that people will need to be educated so they will demand that sugar be taken out of all their food.

Best of Recent Podcasts



by Jill Escher

I walk about an hour each day, so I have the perfect opportunity to keep up with the latest in the podcast-sphere.  If you”re looking for great nutrition science, or stick-to-it inspiration, you have a goldmine to choose from, including classics like Jimmy Moore”s Livin” la Vida Low Carb Show, Sean Croxton”s Underground Wellness and Angelo Coppola”s Latest in Paleo, and newcomers like Jonathan Bailor”s Smarter Science of Slim and, from Down Under, That Paleo Show.

Here are a few from the recent crop worth highlighting:

Tom Naughton and his family guest-hosting Livin” la Vida Low Carb.  Listen to 7 and 9 year-old girls thoroughly outsmart 20,000 staffers of the USDA and FDA.  While the bureaucrats dither, these two say exactly what it will take to end the diabetes/obesity epidemics.  You think I”m kidding? I”m not.  Tune in to episode 664.

Latest in Paleo episode 67. Because everything Angelo Coppola does is sheer genius.  Tune in here. “Eye-opening stories cover the intriguing cereal industry, why the dairy industry would like to change the definition of milk, and you’ll hear a major processed food industry organization try to convince you that all food is processed.”

That Paleo Show episode 5, Why Grains Aren”t Paleo.  Some ideas for living a grain-free life.  Tune in here.

Happy listening!

 

To Lose Weight, Stop Trying to Lose Weight



I’m no Audrey Hepburn but at least I can pull off a little black dress.

by Jill Escher

It’s been several years now since I’ve dropped three dress sizes in a few months and, this is the best part, the part that defies the usual yo-yo diet pattern, I haven’t gained it back.  Yes, there’s that I’m-almost-50-years-old-and-have-given-birth-to-three-kids cushiony stuff around the midsection, I’m no Audrey Hepburn, and I’m hardly a six-pack lean mean gym rat machine, but fat and on the edge of obese? Those days are gone. I’m healthy, energetic and strong and can pull off quite a few little black dresses that were totally beyond reach back in the Sugar Days.

The secret? I don’t try to lose weight.  I neither count calories or use exercise to “burn calories.” I am, like many people who lose weight and then keep it off, aware of my past sugar addiction and stick to eating a satisfying nutrient-rich Paleo-ish diet that keeps my body chemistry on the level, with only minor white-stuff indulgence along the way.  I never go hungry.

I talk to a whole lot of people who are trying to lose weight, and the best advice I can offer is this: Stop trying to lose weight.  On a podcast recently I heard someone say, “You don’t lose weight to get healthy, that’s backwards; by getting healthy you can then lose weight.” True, true.

So, you ask, what does it mean to “get healthy’? It means getting your biochemical house in order:

–Reducing blood sugar levels, and therefore insulin levels (no sugar, no grains, and, depending on your metabolism, light on the starchy stuff like sweet potatoes);
–Increasing micronutrients from your food (veggies, fruits such as berries, grassfed beef, organ meats such as liver, fish, bone broth, nuts);
–Increasing healthy dietary fats (butter, coconut oil, avocados, rendered duck fat, olive oil);
–Eliminating irritating or inflammatory ingredients or foods (grains, sugars, processed foods, industrial vegetable oils): and
–Very low-carb, high-fat eating at breakfast; and no late-night eating (12 hours without food is a realistic goal).

Get your biochemical house in order, and your body’s molecular and hormonal signals will finally shout to your fatty tissues, “You’re not needed anymore! Time to take a hike!” You can’t do this directly, you see, you have no direct power over your own weight.  Your biochemistry is the boss.  And you DO have control over your biochemistry.

While you and I may not end up like Ms. Hepburn, we can certainly reach that healthy place where our bodies are meant to be.

 

Recovered Sugar Addicts Love Helping Others Still Wallowing in the Mud



by Jill Escher

Yesterday I received an email from a gentleman telling me about a new free e-book about sugar addiction and recovery he’s published on Kindle. It’s called Sugar Shame. He wants the world to know about it.

Of course he does.  Most of us who have gone through the process of (1) recognizing and accepting sugar addiction; (2) figuring out how to conquer it; (3) going through the transformation; and (4) recovering our health, wants to spread the word to all those still suffering.  That was my mission, too, in Farewell, Club Perma-Chub.

We don’t publish our books for money — Mr. Halgren is giving his away, and all my proceeds go directly to charity.  We do it because the medical and nutritional establishment is consistently and interminably failing us, and people deserve help, right now, and to know the truth.

So please help spread the word about Sugar Shame, it provides simple, straightforward advice about moving from kitchen-cabinet-junk-food-raider to serene and nourished healthy eating.

And it doesn’t cost a dime.   http://www.amazon.com/Sugar-Shame-carbohydrate-addictions-ebook/dp/B00C8Z6P3Q/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text

 

We’re Baaaaack! On World Autism Awareness Day



by Jill Escher

Hey! It’s April 2, World Autism Awareness Day!

But wait a minute, isn’t this a blog about SUGAR?  What choo doin’ talkin’ bout autism?

Well, if there’s one problem in the world vastly more horrible than the scourge of sugar addiction, it’s the giant and growing autism epidemic afflicting so many hundreds of thousands of our children.  We sugar addicts may suffer extra pounds, bad teeth and swampy moods, but autistic kids? They face a lifetime of catastrophic cognitive and behavioral disability, often plunging their families into despair, not to mention debt and exhaustion.  The latest numbers from the CDC suggest 1 in 50 US kids now have an autism spectrum diagnosis, an explosion of a disability that barely existed just a few decades ago.

But, could there be a connection between sugar and autism?

Yes, but some of the connections are a bit convoluted, bear with me.

1. There are studies showing a modest increase in autism rates among children of women with obesity and/or diabetes. This may be due to the treatment medications, the hyperinsulinemia, or the excess blood sugars.

2.  Sugar is a powerful depressant.  A woman who eats sugar, not to mention processed food including flour, additives, colorings, artificial sweeteners, and preservatives is daily pouring powerful depressants into her sensitive body.  So, eating low-fat crap processed food (that’s often billed as “healthy”) her neurotransmitters go awry and she becomes … depressed.

Her doctor thereupon prescribes an antidepressant drug, usually an SSRI like Prozac, and she starts taking it.  Her doctor never of course informs her that her diet is making her sick and sad, and that an ancestral diet rich in healthy fats, veggies and serotonin-boosting meats will cure her.  Then she becomes addicted to the drugs, and, despite having almost no sex drive, gets pregnant.  Her doctor sticks to the pharma-funded standard of care, and advises her to stay on the drug during her pregnancy.

Then, blammo! A few years later, her kid gets an autism, ADD, or learning disability diagnosis.  Why? Because the kid’s tiny fetal brain was soaked in brain-altering chemicals.  Read this excellent post by Dr. Adam Urato to see the acknowledged connections between fetal SSRI exposure and autism, one trigger behind the autism epidemic no one is talking about.

3.  Sugar overconsumption leads to hormonal dysfunction, and in a woman this can mean PCOS, and excess of testosterone, and infertility. A standard American diet, replete with sugar, flour and processed food can easily trigger hormonal imbalance and difficulty conceiving and maintaining a pregnancy.  So, sugar-addled women often seek help from a fertility clinic, which may use any number of interventions, but most typically IVF.  IVF and other assisted fertility treatments have been shown to boost the risk for imprinting disorders and epigenetic abnormalities that lead to autism.

4.  Let’s not forget the men!  Studies have shown that obese men are more likely to have sperm with epigenetic derangements, and that could mean neurodevelopmental challenges in the offspring.

So, people, on World Autism Awareness Day it actually makes sense to call for the end of sugar addiction in America.  For the good of our children, get healthy, eat real food, get really fertile, lose the meds, and let’s make healthy babies!

 

Easy Weight Loss for Lazy People: Eat a Ton, Don’t Exercise, and Cheat



by Jill Escher, author, Farewell, Club Perma-Chub: A Sugar Addict’s Guide to Easy Weight Loss

It’s absurd and shameful to see our country’s obesity and diabetes rates skyrocketing while our ignorant government-medical-pharma establishment continues to push the stupid solution of “Eat Less, Move More.” Many of us are told we need to surgically remove a good part of a vital organ through a bariatric procedure because we have become so incapable of controlling our appetites.  Or we’re asked to count calories, cut fat, exercise until our knees hurt, suffering deprivation and hunger all the while. And we believe this stuff.

Well, guess what.  We aren’t lazy.  We aren’t gorging.  And no one, anywhere, any time, will subject themselves to hunger and deprivation over a prolonged period of time.  Just a generation ago, obesity and diabetes (what I call “sugar and starch poisoning syndrome) were rare, and that’s not because our ancestors were morally superior or more ferocious exercisers.  It’s because our generation, unlike others, has been subtlely poisoned on a mass scale. How? By industrial, processed, junk food that hijacks our delicate and vulnerable hormonal and neurotransmitter systems, creating a deranged biochemical system that all at once retains fat and craves sugar.

So it stands to reason that we can exit this totally preventable epidemic by removing the modern poisons from our diets, rather than via the misery of endless diet-and-exercise.  Remove the the modern processed food, and your biochemistry will normalize, resulting in fat loss, new energy, better sleep, glowing skin, fewer aches and pains, the end of depression, and less risk of heart disease, stroke, and cancer, to name just a few of the benefits. This approach to weight loss requires almost no effort and not a speck of deprivation, although for many the withdrawal from sugar (and wheat, for many), can insert a temporary, surmoutable roadbump.

So what should a Person of Average Laziness do to lose weight with ease?  Just following the following three (easy) rules: EAT A TON, DON’T EXERCISE, AND CHEAT. It’s all so uncomplicated, I could scream (AAAAAARRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGHHHHHHH! That feels better.)

1.  EAT A TON OF FOOD.  That’s right.  Eat a lot, piles of it.  Hunger is the enemy of weight loss; any sense of deprivation could prompt a binge.  What kind of food? Real food, the unprocessed stuff, stuff that grows on trees or comes from the ground or from an animal, and never touches the blade of a processing machine or the roar of a factory, the stuff that our distant ancestors would recognize as food.  But no sugar, grains, corn, soy, or rice.  And go easy on potatoes.  You can roast, stir-fry, pan-cook, bake, or make salads.  Mix up veggies, meat, and nuts with good oils like coconut oil, butter or olive oil. Read some books on Paleo nutrition or inspiration and understanding; this stuff is not brain surgery.

I’m too lazy and busy to spend a lot of time cooking, so I keep my food simple and prep time to a minimum. So, for example, for breakfast, I often have two eggs cooked in olive oil, half an avocado, two tangerines, and chopped almonds.  For lunch, a big bowl of mixed roasted veggies like Brussells sprouts, tomatoes, red bell peppers, butternut squash, onions, garlic, and carrots (5 minutes to prep, 40 to cook) with some seasoned carne asada (5 minutes to cook) plus some grapes and mixed nuts.  For dinner, a piece of salmon cooked atop a bed of spinach (8 minutes to cook) with a chopped salad with tasty olive oil and balsamic dressing (3 minutes to prep).

When cravings hit or I need to snack, I’ll eat grapes, cheese and nuts, or almond butter with apples, or sliced veggies and cheese.  Never, ever go hungry. If you need five heaping meals a day at the start, so be it; you’ll probably see your need for huge quantities of food diminish over time as your body becomes more fully nourished and you lower your blood sugar and lose your addictions.

2.  DON’T EXERCISE.  If there’s one thing we can learn from experience and the research, it’s that exercise does not produce sustainable weight loss.  While I do recommend exercise — for fun, energy, muscle tone, metabolism, and mood — it can make us really hungry while failing to “burn calories” (which doesn’t really happen anyway). Weight loss is NOT a calorie game — it’s a hormone game (staring with the control of insulin by lowering your blood sugar), and a neurotransmitter game (by overcoming addiction to sugar and starch).  For me, daily walks and some simple resistance exercises like squats, push-ups and lunges do the trick; I feel zero guilt about not sweating.

3.  CHEAT.  People’s biggest fear when starting down the Just-Eat-Real-Food (as the great Sean Crawford calls it, JERF) path is the idea that ice cream or cupcakes or dutch crunch bread or Doritos or whatever sugary, starchy favorite stuff will be lost to them forever. But fear not! Once you remove the offending foods from your system for a period long enough to regain a normal biochemistry unhindered by the insulin spikes and dopamine rushes caused by processed food, you can experiment with cheating.  After about 6 months of being totally sugar-free, I found I could sneak a sweet here and there without much of a problem.  And even if you resume a bit of junk-food eating, 2 or 3 teaspoons worth of sugar a day, which will feel like a lot to a happy body that has experienced the joy of JERF, that sure the heck beats 22 a day, the daily average American consumption.

You can do this.  Anyone can do this.  If you need more details, may I humbly recommend you buy my book.  It’s cheap, available via Kindle and paperback, and all proceeds benefit autism charities.  Anyone who wants to buy a dozen or more, for clients, gyms, or friends, can get a steep discount by contacting me directly.  Good luck and let me know how it goes, at hijillescher@gmail.com.

Of Course Sugar Should Be Taxed



Rethink your drink, say the proponents of Richmond's soda tax measure.

by Jill Escher

Election time is around the corner and nowhere are the Sugar Wars being waged as fiercely as in Richmond, California, where the voters are considering a measure that would impose a one-cent-per-ounce sales tax on sugar-sweetened beverages.  Fearing a domino effect should the measure pass, the soda industry has poured millions into fighting it, arguing that beverages are unfairly being singled out and that there’s no assurance the tax proceeds will be spent on meaningful anti-obesity programs.

The premise behind the ballot measure is simple: soda and similar sugary drinks are a leading cause of obesity and preventable disease like diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and the government ends up footing the bill for a whole lot of this disability, so let’s tax the junk to discourage consumption while also helping pay for anti-obesity programs.

I’m not a big fan of taxation generally, since I distrust most governments to spend our money wisely, but when it comes to sugar and junk food and drink generally, I see a role for taxation to account for the “externalities” caused by individual behavior.  In other words, if the taxpayers are going to be on the hook for much of the disability and medical costs caused by chronic sugar consumption, it makes sense to impose most of those costs on those causing the problems, that is, those people chowing down the white stuff. And taxation is a reasonable way to internalize those costs.

But it begs the question, why soda? Why not tax all sugar?  After all, as Dr. Lustig wisely points out, refined sugar is poison and its overconsumption is a major trigger for today’s horrific but perfectly preventable epidemics (yes, there are other causes, sugar/HFCS is but one).  I say Richmond’s measure does not go far enough. Let’s fundamentally change our culture’s relationship with sugar by placing it in the category it deserves: a toxic and addictive substance like tobacco and alcohol, which per prudence and public health necessitates a measure of control.

 

© Copyright 2011 ~ End Sugar Addiction -